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Know the Law: Arbitration Clause Depends on Particular Situation

Written by: Jeremy T. Walker

Published in the Union Leader (2/1/2016)

Q.  I recently formed a small but growing company.  We enter into various contracts with distributors, vendors and customers, and someone told me I should include a mandatory arbitration clause in all my contracts.  Is that prudent?

It depends on what you are hoping to achieve by way of an arbitration clause.  Many business owners are under the impression that arbitration provides a quicker, more efficient and cheaper method than litigation to resolve business disputes.  Although that may be true in some cases, it certainly is not true in all cases, and quite often arbitration can now be considerably more expensive than litigation.  

Conventional wisdom in the past was that arbitration was cheaper than litigation, but that is no longer the case in many situations.  The filing fee and administrative costs typically are higher than the associated filing and administrative costs for bringing a lawsuit in court.  Furthermore, arbitrators usually are lawyers or retired judges, so in addition to incurring attorneys’ fees to pay your own lawyer, you will also need to split the fees of the arbitrator with the opposing party, and those fees can be considerable if the arbitration extends over multiple days.  Thus, costs alone may not weigh in arbitration’s favor over litigation.

Another concern for you may be the speed in which disputes can be resolved.  Our federal and state courts in New Hampshire generally are quite efficient in processing cases through congested dockets, so cases move through New Hampshire courts much quicker than in many other states.  That being said, if both parties to an arbitration are aligned in their desire to have the arbitration process proceed as quickly as possible, arbitration may well allow for a quicker resolution.  That is not always the case, however, if the dispute is going to require significant discovery before resolution.  If so, arbitration may take as long as or longer than litigation in a court. 

One principal reason many businesses will opt for arbitration is because it provides a private forum where the parties do not have to air their dispute in the public courtroom, and that may trump the other factors for some businesses.  In sum, whether to include an arbitration clause will depend on your particular circumstances, and there are many factors you should discuss with your counsel.

Jeremy Walker can be reached at [email protected].

Know the Law is a bi-weekly column sponsored by McLane Middleton, Professional Association.   We invite your questions of business law.  Questions and ideas for future columns should be addressed to:  McLane Middleton, 900 Elm Street, Manchester, NH 03101 or emailed to [email protected].  Know the Law provides general legal information, not legal advice.  We recommend that you consult a lawyer for guidance specific to your particular situation.

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